WorldOpp fellow

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Any WorldOpp fellow (previously known as CNM Cloud Project Coordinator; hereinafter, the Fellow) is either a(n):

  1. Apprentice working at WorldOpp Fellow Staff (hereinafter, the Team) of the Friends Of CNM; OR
  2. If the position is open and no apprentice is available to fill it in, independent contractor,

who administratively supports, virtually and/or onsite, CNM Cloud Project (hereinafter, the Project), and/or owns Certware, Labware, Linkupware, Mailware, Middleware, Pageware, Socialware, Ventureware, Talkware, Tubeware, Wikiware, and/or its components and/or related CNM Cyber services.

The Project is being undertaken in order to design and deliver a group of services, which are jointly called CNM Cyber, for the Career Network Ministry and its patrons (hereinafter, the Users). The Project is currently at its third phase, which is called CNM Cloud Usable. Several sub-projects such as CNM Registration Project are designed to clarify the Project.


Contents

Position overview

The initial Fellow's role is broad; further, it is narrowed down depending on the budget, business needs, and circumstances. The special onboarding process is designed to prepare any Fellow Candidate to act in any of the roles above.

History

Gary Ihar has been serving as both the Fellow and the Customer since the inception of the Project. His contributions can be tracked at Contributions/Gary. However, Gary Ihar would now like to concentrate on the Customer's role and hire additional Fellows for various deliverables in order to expedite the project.

Inspirations

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.

-- Theodore Roosevelt, "Citizenship In A Republic", the Sorbonne, Paris, France, April 23rd, 1910

Occupation(s)

The CNM Cyber Team calls the identical position a Project Coordinator. At the Occupational Information Network, the closest occupation to the Coordinator's role is Information Technology Project Manager.
The Coordinators are expected to perform one or more of the following roles: account manager, accountant, business administrator, business analyst, business buyer, configuration manager, content manager, contracts administrator, DevOps engineer, functional manager, information architect, partner liaison, procurement manager, product designer, product owner, project manager, Scrum Master, solution architect, systems engineer, team lead, usability analyst, and/or UX designer.
Generally speaking, the Coordinators may deal with anything from product envisioning to administrative support.

Purpose(s)

Development of the target deliverables is the primary measurable result of the Coordinator's work. The Coordinators are in the center of that development:
  1. While working on the requirements, the Coordinators collect the requirements that are stated by the Customer and other stakeholders, envision the desired services, document their visions into concepts, and get their concepts approved by the Customer or other product owners.
  2. While working on the shippable deliverables, the Coordinators make the approved concepts real. The Coordinators do so directly and/or, if needed, through contracting of other developers. At CNM Cyber, the contracted developers are called Careerprise contractors.
The Coordinators also work on the DevOps instruments. These deliverables support both envisioning of the products to be built (i.e. aid the work on the requirements) and the making them real (i.e. aid the work on the shippable deliverables).

Position requirements

Ability to deliver one of the target deliverables is the primary requirement to any incumbent of the Fellow's position.

Accessibility requirements

The Fellow shall need to:
  1. Be ready to be paid through PayPal or Payoneer. The Fellow can also choose some freelance marketplaces, but, in that case, he or she shall be willing to pay their fees and compensate other possible expenses.
  2. Have an access to the Internet if he or she works remotely.
  3. Use his or her computing device such as a desktop computer, laptop, and/or smart phone. No software is needed to be installed in order to work on the Project; however, some freelance marketplaces such as Upwork may require to install time-tracking software.

Desired skills

If the Fellows haven't developed the desired skills yet, they are invited to develop a variety of skills while on the job.
  • Assertiveness. Skills to communicate concerns are, probably, the most valuable skills to perform that job. If you lack any diplomacy, the Friends Of CNM needs you urgently!
  • Creativity. Envisioning the product the Customer pays for is a must-have skill for the Fellow.
  • Curiosity. Willingness to understand the Customer's needs and high willingness to ask questions is a must. No Fellow can succeed while being afraid of looking and/or sounding foolish.
  • English language. The Fellow's position requires some level of English, spoken and/or written; however, perfect English is not a core requirement. Vice versa, the position incumbent can use this opportunity to update their language skills.
  • Error-making. Willingness to make errors is highly welcome since many parts of job responsibilities assume such heuristics as fail-fast, trial and error, and learning through failure.
  • Information technology. No technical skills are required in order to start; however, willingness to learn can be extremely helpful.
  • Written communication. The Fellow's job involves heavy communication and written communication is more important than oral or non-verbal one.

Educational credentials

Because of uniqueness of the Fellow's position, no formal educational credential is needed. At any rate, your possible abilities to listen to a professor, read a textbook, do some drills, and take a quiz will be unlikely needed if you are selected. Basically, two features may predict the Fellow's success:
  • Ability to use CNM Agile framework (scroll down or click here for its details), which is rarely taught in formal schools. Usually, the Fellow candidates possess these skills through self-study and practice.
  • Capacity to create, be curious, and make errors may refer to one's natural capacity. Quoting Pablo Picasso,

    Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up.

    Some teachers may boost one's natural artistic capacity; some may destroy. Thus, your possible GED, high school diploma, or university degree may mean that you have lost your ability to learn and adapt without professors, textbooks, drills, and quizzes. Vice versa, school drop-outs may have even a greater chance to succeed as the Fellows.
At the same time, Friends Of CNM may place the Fellow in the college or another educational institution, where he or she will acquire the academic degree or another educational credential.

Required behaviors

To perform efficiently as a part of CNM Cyber Team, the Coordinators are expected to exhibit three following behaviors:
  1. Asking questions
  2. Making sense of the work.
  3. Reporting progress, as well as ideas and inconsistencies.
  4. Taking risks

Communicate whenever anything of any sort is not clear. CNM Cyber Team members will be available for any sort of assistance. The more you communicate and ask question, you'll more likely be favored to qualify for further stages. This is because in order to fully accomplish a task, its purpose and every aspect is to be fully understood. And the one who asks more, learns more. So keep the fear of communicating and making mistakes aside and ask whatever you feel like. Because we believe that,

Fear of making a mistake at CNM Cyber Team is the biggest mistake. -- Gary Ihar

Therefore, asking questions, communicating and suggesting improvements will highly be appreciated at CNM Cyber. Assessing activities of the course are also designed accordingly, as to judge Candidate's critical analysis and communication ability.
  • Aspirants must report any sort of inconsistency occurred during the course, preferably with a screenshot. It shall be communicated to technical department immediately.

Required mindset

Required skills

The abilities to perform as the Coordinator is the only single requirement to candidate's abilities; all the other requirements are originated from those abilities. Gary Ihar described this position to aspiring Coordinators in that way:

The Coordinator's position can differ dramatically from everything you have experienced in your school, work, and, possibly, family. At your school, you probably followed instructions that your teacher gave. Most likely, your supervisor instructed you at your previous works, if any. Not everyone is the primary family manager, so you might have never supervised your family.

The Coordinators don't have formal teachers, supervisors, or managers. They serve the client, currently, me, and can have mentors, but the Coordinators should make decisions on what they are going to do and how their job is going to be done within the factors required by the Friends Of CNM, applicable laws, and ethics.

The job is not going to be easy, and its landing is just its beginning. For many Coordinators, the hardest parts are being honest, trusting yourself, overcoming your fears, and exiting your comfort zone. The more you assert your concerns, ask your questions, try new things, and make errors while trying, the easier your transition be.

On the first day of their employment, the Coordinators must use CNM Agile framework (scroll down or click here for its details) in order to support development of one of the target deliverables. Until a candidate is capable to work, he or she is invited to obtain the needed skills through a training series that consists of CNM Cyber Welcome Session, CNM Cyber Orientation, and CNM Cyber Placement.

Consumers

As of mid-Spring of 2020, the Fellows serve three groups of consumers. The product owner role is vacant at the time, so the Customer has to temporarily fill it in.

Customer

Gary Ihar (herein, above, and after, the Customer) is the customer and, currently, product owner of CNM Cyber. That means that he authorizes the work of the Fellow and pays his or her bills.

Developers

Developers (hereinafter, the Developers) who those people who create those services of CNM Cyber that the End-users will use when these services are eventually developed. The Fellows themselves belong to the Developers group as well.

End-users

End-users (hereinafter, the End-users) of CNM Cyber are those people who are on the job market, could be, or are going to be there and use CNM Cyber as their tool to position themselves on the market, be more competitive there, and/or land a job.

Other stakeholders

The Career Network Ministry (CNM), its leadership and patrons are the stakeholders by default. The People section of the CNM Cloud Usable wikipage names all the identified stakeholders of the CNM Cloud Project.

Target deliverables

For its consumers, CNM Cyber features three types of target deliverables:

  1. DevOps instruments, which are those that support development of requirements and/or shippable deliverables regardless of the fact that these deliverables are not a direct part of either requirements or shippable deliverables.
  2. Requirements, which are those concepts that the Developers can use to develop shippable deliverables.
  3. Shippable deliverables, which are those that the End-users, not only the Developers, can use for long term. The Developers make the shippable deliverables according to the requirements.

The high-level deliverables are listed in the Deliverables of the Phase section of the CNM Cloud Usable wikipage.

DevOps instruments

At CNM Cyber, DevOps instruments are those that support development of requirements and/or shippable deliverables regardless of the fact that these deliverables are not a direct part of either requirements or shippable deliverables. These increments can also be called "instrumental deliverables".
The DevOps instruments can be divided in three groups:
  1. Ongoing operations. At CNM Cyber, Careerprise contractors run ongoing operations; nevertheless, the Fellows develop the contract forms, source contractor candidates, award the contracts, bring the contractors on the board, and make sure that the ongoing operations go smoothly.
  2. Projects to aid development. Those deliverables that are not concepts, but are utilized in the development.
  3. Short-term aids for end-users. Those deliverables that the End-users can use short-term.
The sub-sections in three sections below reflect just some notable DevOps instruments. The list is not complete; moreover, they may not have precise limits. For instance, while organizing a meeting, the Fellow is likely to document it, as well as, if needed, clarify this very job description, build partnerships, manage the personnel, administer public relations, recruit, and/or test.

Requirements

At CNM Cyber, requirements are those concepts that the Developers can use to develop shippable deliverables. Alternatively, they can be called conceptual deliverables. The Customer and other product owners approve or disapprove the requirements and, if approved, use them as reference points while accepting the Developers' work.
The concepts are, in fact, requirements that can be expressed by documents, videos, and prototypes. At CNM Cyber, the concepts are presented as:
Those deliverables that are not concepts, but may be used by the Developers, are a part of the DevOps instruments.

Shippable deliverables

At CNM Cyber, shippable deliverables are those that the End-users, not only the Developers, can use for long term. The Developers make the shippable deliverables according to the requirements. Those deliverables that the End-users can use short-term are a part of the DevOps instruments.
The shippable deliverables can be divided in three groups:
  1. All the components of end-user services. For instance, CNM Cert includes CNM Cyber Welcome Session, CNM Cyber Orientation, CNM Cyber Placement, and other courses that are efficient in enabling contractors, employees, users, and volunteers of CNM Cyber.
  2. End-user services of the CNM Cyber in general. They include CNM Cabin, Cert, Lab, Linkup, Mail, Page, Social, Venture, Talk, Tube, and Wiki, as well as HandsOnApps and NextApps.
  3. Those systems that support CNM Cyber. They include CNM Certware, Labware, Linkupware, Mailware, Middleware, Pageware, Servers, Socialware, Ventureware, Tubeware, and Wikiware.

Ongoing operations

The Fellows primarily work on projects, which are temporary endeavors undertaken to create new components of CNM Cyber. Every component is unique. Ongoing operations differ from projects. These operations are constant and undertaken to continue existing processes, not create new ones. They are no longer unique. For instance, all the CNM Servers must be up and running to support the CNM Cyber developments. In that way, ongoing operations undertaken to run these servers, in fact, support development of the target deliverables.

At CNM Cyber, Careerprise contractors run ongoing operations; nevertheless, the Fellows develop the contract forms, source contractor candidates, award the contracts, bring the contractors on the board, and make sure that the ongoing operations go smoothly. So, those awarded contracts and documents that contribute to the ongoing operations of CNM Cyber are the major deliverables in that group of the DevOps instruments.

Awarded ongoing contracts

With regard to ongoing operations, the Team needs help with sourcing and onboarding of new contractors, awarding the contracts, as well as with keeping the existing contractors engaged. Particularly, the Fellow may:
  • Organize procurement after specific conceptual requirements have been approved to become SBIs.
  • Develop the procurement process that shall utilize CNM Lab as the place of transfer of the developed software from the contractors to the Friends Of CNM.
  • Source, select, and onboard contractors;
  • Track their time and performance outcomes;
  • Solve emerging problems and arrange the negotiated payments.

Ongoing documents

Besides the documentation that expresses the requirements, the Team needs help with various types of documents such as:
  • Description of processes and procedures developed for and used by the Team. Particularly, the Fellow may assist in (a) development of the policies and instructions such as how the Developers shall learn their tasks and ways to submit their deliverables, (b) testing the developed policies and instructions, as well as (c) helping the users, contractors, and employees to use those policies and instructions.
  • Forms for contracts such as the Careerprise independent contractor agreement with those:
    1. Contractors that shall support those parts of CNM Cloud that have been developed. Particularly, the Fellow may assist in (a) identifying and documenting requirements for the supporting contractors, (b) sourcing, selecting, and onboarding new contractors, and (c) keeping the already hired contractors complying.
    2. Employees who shall manage CNM Cyber, which include those services that are based on CNM Cloud. Particularly, the Fellow may assist in (a) identifying and documenting requirements for the employees, (b) sourcing, selecting, and onboarding new employees, and (c) keeping the already hired employees performing.
    3. Partners.
  • Organizational structures that are efficient in organizing users', contractors', and employees' performance, as well as tracking their time and paying their bills.
All the types of public documentation shall be maintained at the CNM Wiki, so any Team's stakeholder, and a volunteer especially, be able to find needed information. All the types of private documentation shall be maintained at the CNM Lab.

Projects to aid development

Another part of the DevOps instruments is those deliverables that are not concepts, but are utilized in the development. For instance, the developers create the shippable deliverables; however, sourcing and onboarding of the future developers belong to the DevOps instruments. So, these deliverables may include awarded contracts and documents that contribute to the development, as well as landed partnerships, onboarded Developers, recruited Developers, and tested services.

Awarded project contracts

With regard to development, the Team needs help with sourcing and onboarding of new contractors, awarding the contracts, as well as with keeping the existing contractors engaged. Particularly, the Fellow may:
  • Source, select, and onboard contractors;
  • Track their time and performance outcomes;
  • Solve emerging problems and arrange the negotiated payments.

Landed partnerships

The Team needs help with sourcing, selecting, and onboarding Careerprise partners such as employers, training providers, governmental, and non-profit organizations.

Meetings

The Team views meetings as vital tools for development of the target deliverables and, particularly, recruiting its Developers. Thus, the Team needs help with organizing of various CNM Cyber events such as CNM Cyber seminars and CNM Cyber standups.
Those meetings that are open to the general public can be organized using partner meetup groups such as CNM Cyber Meetup group and the WorldOpp Facebook page.

Onboarded Developers

The Team needs help with onboarding of the onboarded End-users through further development of the CNM Cyber Placement, as well as other services such as helping the newly-hired Developers to track their time and develop their personal plans. The Fellow may also outline a new mentor-protégé program for those Team recruits who needs to be trained one-on-one.
On another side, the Fellow may explore whether the onboarded Developers understand what results are expected out of their performance and how to communicate their challenges with the Team and, if needed, with the Customer.

Project documents

Besides the documentation that expresses the requirements, the Team needs help with various types of documents such as:
  • Minutes for meetings of the Team so all the Developers know what progress on the project is and what primary plans are in order to develop the target deliverables as soon and as better as possible.
  • User experience feedback on the Team's materials and resources, so the Team would be able to include new tasks into their Sprint backlog.
All the types of public documentation shall be maintained at the CNM Wiki, so any Team's stakeholder, and a volunteer especially, be able to find needed information. All the types of private documentation shall be maintained at the CNM Lab.

Recruited Developers

The Team needs help with sourcing of new Developers, as well as keeping the existing ones engaged. Particularly, the Fellow may:
On another side, the Fellow may explore whether the recruited Careerprise contractors understand what they are expected to produce and how to transfer their deliverables to the Team.

Tested services

The Team needs help with testing of its services. The results of this testing shall be documented using discussion pages of CNM Wiki.

Short-term aids for end-users

The final group of the DevOps instruments is those deliverables such as ad-hoc training, meetings, newsletters, and onboarded End-users that the End-users can use short-term. Later, some of these deliverables such as meeting minutes and video recordings may become a part of the archive.

The Fellow may or may not be dedicated to DevOps instruments' development only, but any Fellow is expected to support the Project in any meaningful way:

Ad-hoc training

Because of the rapid developments, the Team may need help with ad-hoc training for the developers and/or end-users to adjust to new systems.

Newsletters

The Team needs help with drafting Friends Of CNM newsletters.

Onboarded End-users

The Team needs help with onboarding of new End-users through further development of the mandatory CNM Cyber Welcome Session and optional CNM Cyber Orientation.
On another side, the Fellow may explore whether the End-users understand how to take advantage of the Team's operations.

Text improvements

The simplest actions to produce short-term aids for end-users may include correcting grammatical errors and asking questions when some parts of the texts at CNM Wiki and/or other services of CNM Cyber are unclear.

Work environment

If the Fellow has obtained employment authorization to work in the United States, he or she may choose to work onsite in Vienna, Virginia. Remote positions are available for all regardless of their location.

Assets available

The assets that are available to the Fellow include:

Assigned tasks

No one provides the Fellows with any task, assignment, duty, etc. beyond two initial tasks:
  1. Read this job description; AND
  2. Ask specific questions when anything is not clear while quoting what is not clear.
Generally speaking, the Fellow is supposed to create his or her own tasks, assignments, duties, etc., if he or she needs those.

Instructions

No further instructions beyond those general ones that are expressed on this very page would be available. If hired, all of your tasks will be unique, no one has done them before you. Therefore, no one could create clear step-by-step instructions that would reflect your future actions exactly or precisely. Vice versa, you are encouraged to improve existing general instructions for yourself or someone else.

Nature of work

The brief description would be that the Fellow should be comfortable to work in any area of operations until this area is both ethical and legal.

Responsibilities

The Fellow's position does not imply any mandated responsibilities. All the responsibilities are self-imposed -- let say, if the Fellow organizes a meeting and no other event host is going to be there, this Fellow should be virtually present during that meeting.

Financial procedures

To be paid, the Fellow should follow the procedures as follows.

Billing

The Fellow is expected to bill the Customer. Unless another payment method is agreed on, the Fellow must request the pay through PayPal or Payoneer. The request must include the sum and link to the Billable items report.

Billable items

The Fellows can be paid for completed Sprints only. That means that any Fellow shall start and finish one Sprint in order to be paid. Those DevOps instruments that the Fellow may produce outside those Sprints that he or she claimed must be bulked as a Miscellaneous Sprint. All the work to be billed for shall be included in the report.
For any SBI, the report shall include the Sprint version, the number of hours worked, a brief description of work done, the overall completion rate of the SBI after the work, and the challenges that have been discovered during the work and need to be further addressed.

Pay rates

The Coordinitor's work is paid according to one of two types of rates:
  • Hourly rate, which must be negotiated with Customer individually until an WorldOpp incubator has been developed. In order to be paid, any hourly work must be authorized.
  • A half of profits from the activities, which are paid by third parties. Third parties are entities different from the Friends Of CNM and the Fellows. For instance, if the Fellow organizes an event, which has generated $60 in sales with $10 of expenses, this Fellow will receive ( $60 - $10 ) * 0.5 = $25. Or, if the Fellow mentors a client for 10 hours on a subject of passing the CNM Cyber Welcome Session and the client pays $10 per hour, the Fellow will receive $10 * 10 * 0.5 = $50.

Weekly basis

The Fellows are paid on the weekly basis. That means that all the payments are processed on a weekly basis. Any other period must be negotiated and agreed on in advance. Working without billing is considered volunteering, which fits into the CNM Cyber Project Coordinator's category.

Work authorization

To be authorized, any work shall meet two requirements:
  • Be stated in one of primary backlogs; and
  • Not be actively claimed by any other Fellow. To claim the work, the Fellow shall follow the Sprint Zero procedures.
Only authorized work is budgeted; that means that the Fellow can be paid while only working on the authorized work.

CNM Agile

In its operations, the Team utilizes CNM Agile, which is an adaptation of the agile methodology to handle effort administration that the Team practices. The Team in general and the Fellows particularly are expected to undertake various effort administration endeavors until the Project is complete.

CNM Agile vs Agile Scrum

The table below differences between CNM Agile and Agile Scrum:
Feature CNM Agile Agile Scrum
Documentation Comprehensive documentation Working products over comprehensive documentation
Location Virtual collaboration is welcome Collocation is required
Standups Weekly Daily
Mastership Distributed among members Dedicated role

Daily routine

For the Fellows:

  • No exact number of work hours exist; however, the Fellows may be given the limit of paid hours that they are authorized to work on the Project. The Fellows are commonly able to work fewer hours if they choose so.
  • No manager is available for routine performances; the Fellows themselves are supposed to define and/or re-define what, when, and where they are going to do.
  • No maximum of available positions exists; the Team is committed to hiring more and more Fellows until the Project is accomplished.
  • No single work day is going to be the same with regard to your tasks; however, the Fellow are able to setup their schedules on themselves. This also means that the Fellows are not bound to work on any particular hours and are allowed to choose hours on their own.
  • No sole area of operations is specified for any particular Fellow. Depending on the exact deliverable (see the target deliverables) or its requirements, that the Fellow works on, he or she may perform in some combination of activities. Generally speaking, the Fellow are expected to work in any area of operations until they are both legal and ethical.

DREPD method

To plan any Sprint, the Fellow may utilize the method that is called DREPD as follows:
  1. Discover what the customer pays for, what legal, organizational, and production factors are, and what resources are available. In order to discover, the Fellow is encouraged to ask questions, research available sources, test available resources, and experiment.
  2. Research what can be done within available resources and under existing factors. In order to analyze, the Fellow is encouraged to use critical thinking and imagination.
  3. Envision what should be done out of available choices. In order to envision, the Fellow is encouraged to design those solutions that would solve those problems that arise out of the project. Those Team members who work on the requirements are expected to produce user story drafts at the end of the modeling endeavors.
  4. Plan how something that needs to be done would be done, how to stay in touch with the customer and other stakeholders, and how to document the developments. In order to plan, the Fellow is encouraged to produce some deliverables such as user stories, content, future event details, etc., as well as related documentation.
  5. Do and discover more, which means do what you planned, discover what you have missed before, discover what happens when you do, discover what you have done, and re-start the DREPD cycle again.
To illustrate the method, let's consider the following example. Imagine a kid who discovers that a neighboring store has a toy that this kid wants at any cost. This kid would research for possible options of obtaining that, envision a strategy to pursue, and plan for actions. If the kid selected a parent or grandparent as a possible payer, this kid would plan whom the kid would talk to, how, and when. Kids tend to be naturally skilled in the DREPD; while growing up, some adults lose that natural capacity.

Example

This very page can serve as an example of the Project deliverables. The need to develop this page emerged when the need in the Fellow did. Then, the page has been developed (and will further be developed) in Sprints. Every Sprint:
  1. Started with some vision that the candidates for the Fellow's position would like to have enough information to decide whether this position fits their needs and, if so, get started,
  2. When a new vision was established, some texts to execute that vision were developed (anyone can see the history of those developments at View history (scroll up to the View history button or click here),
  3. When new texts were developed, new candidates were invited to apply,
  4. When new candidates applied, they established new sets of concerns that were used to establish a new vision.
The cycles are more sporadic rather than organized. New Sprints will be undertaken until the Project is completed.

Process vs result

The Fellow's activities are more result-oriented rather than process-oriented. What does it mean?
  • If some candidate would like to perform routine, repetitive activities such as, for instance, clicking buttons, entering data, or finding info on the World Wide Web, for which often detailed instructions exist, this candidate could be considered as process-oriented. He or she would unlikely succeed as the Fellow.
  • More successful candidates for the Fellow's role tend to be result-oriented. They ask, What do you want me to accomplish? rather than, What do I need to do? The Fellows may do everything, until it is legal and ethical, in order to get the deliverable (see target deliverables), its feature, or its requirements that the Fellow works on.
Generally speaking, those positions that involve product ownership and/or project management tend to be result-oriented. When you are an entrepreneur, the fact whether you have generated profits matter much more than what you do until you do something legal and ethical. Your work is measured by results, not processes.

Viable DREPD

Effort administration is the intersection of product ownership and project management. Any cycle of effort administration consists of several stages, during some of which what needs to be made is defined and during the others what is defined to be made is actually made:
  1. Product ownership aims to define what needs to be made. Those Fellows who act as business analysts and product owners work on the requirements of the Project. The results of their work are requirements such as user stories for the Developers; AND
  2. Project management aims to make what is defined to be made. Those Fellows who,
The Viable DREPD method captures this feature and ascertains that every viable development cycle should include at least two DREPDs:
  1. Deductive DREPD that aims to create a concept and define what needs to be done; and
  2. Inductive DREPD that aims to make the created concept real.
Complex developments casually consist of several cycles, because both the created concepts and shippable deliverables can be improved several times.

Sprints

In CNM Agile, every CNM Agile Sprint is a project that consists of three project phases:

  1. Sprint Zero Phase is an endeavor undertaken to prepare and plan for the Shippable Sprint.
  2. The goal of Shippable Sprint Phase is to create a deliverable that aims to complete, partially or fully, one SBI.
  3. The last phase, Billable Sprint Phase, is an endeavor undertaken to bill the Customer for a completed work within the whole CNM Agile Sprint. Billing the Customer closes that Sprint.

Unless other duration is agreed on, every CNM Agile Sprint lasts up to one week. Every Sprint must have one or more phases, each of them may consist of several DREPD cycles. During every Sprint, the Fellow must follow the Any time, any phase's guidelines.

Sprint Zero Phase

In CNM Agile, Sprint Zero Phase (or, simply, Sprint Zero) is a project phase undertaken to prepare and plan for work on a deliverable that addresses one SBI. To prepare and plan, the Fellow must follow the Any time, any phase's guidelines and shall:
  1. Pick up one unclaimed SBI. The SBIs can be found in three Sprint backlogs, which are requirements', DevOps instruments', and shippable deliverables' backlogs.
  2. Type the date in the 2-digit-month/2-digit-day/4-digit-year format name after the text of the SBI that the Fellow picked up. For instance, 04/12/2020 would indicate the twelfth of April, 2020. This action would claim the SBI.
  3. If the SBI doesn't contain its wikipage link, link the SBI to the wikipage.
  4. Go to the discussion page paired with the linked wikipage.
  5. On that discussion page, add the Sprint Zero version in the Service-name X0.x format as a new topic. The Service-name is the one-word name of one of CNM Cyber's 12 services: Cabin, Cert, Lab, Linkup, Mail, Page, Servers, Social, Venture, Talk, Tube, Wiki. The uppercase X should be substituted with the Sprint phase letter and the lowercase x should be substituted with the ordinary number of a new Sprint Zero. The concept of Sprint versions is detailed at the Development cycle section. The Sprint phase letter shall be one of six options: A, B, C, D, E, or F. If no Sprint Zero has occurred, the ordinary number shall be substituted with 1. For instance, Cert B0.1 would indicate the first Sprint Zero undertaken to plan one's creation of a user story out of the CNM Cert product epic.
  6. Prior to interviews, conduct preliminary research on the claimed SBI. The Fellow must study any relevant content on CNM Cyber, especially CNM Wiki, and browse the World Wide Web.
  7. List possible stakeholders and reach out to them to collect their requirements. According to the Any time, any phase requirement, this activity can iterate several times at various points of the Sprint.
  8. Estimate the work on the claimed SBI and, particularly, suggest what the Fellow is going to do and what completeness of the claimed SBI the Fellow expects at the end of the whole Sprint.
  9. Publish the Sprint Zero version and its link in the Sprint log section of the CNM Cloud Usable wikipage as a part of the next CNM Cyber standup in the Standup Sprint-Zero-version format. If no standup is scheduled or a scheduled standup's time frame doesn't work for the Fellow or doesn't fit the Sprint schedule, contact the Customer and schedule a personal standup.
  10. Participate in a CNM Cyber standup as a part of the research.
  11. Shape the vision of the product epic that is the Sprint deliverable, as well as other plans and estimates based on results of the research.
  12. Add the Sprint version in the Sprint Xx.y format as a new topic on the discussion page paired with the wikipage that serves as a product epic. The uppercase X should coincide with the Sprint Zero letter, the lowercase x should coincide with the Sprint Zero number, and the lowercase y should be substituted with the ordinary number of a new Sprint. If no Sprint has occurred, substitute with 1. For instance, Wiki A1.3 would indicate the third Sprint undertaken to plan one's improvement of the CNM Wiki wikipage as the product epic for this service.

Shippable Sprint Phase

In CNM Agile, Shippable Sprint Phase (or, simply, Shippable Sprint) is a project phase undertaken to create a deliverable that aims to make real, partially or fully, one SBI. To work out an SBI, the Fellow must follow the Any time, any phase's guidelines and shall:
  1. Work on the claimed SBI according to or close to the plan developed in the Sprint Zero.
  2. When any new data emerges and/or any changes are needed, get back to the Sprint Zero to update its documentation.

Billable Sprint Phase

In CNM Agile, Billable Sprint Phase (or, simply, Billable Sprint) is a project phase undertaken to bill the Customer for the work within the whole CNM Agile Sprint. To bill, the Fellow must follow the Any time, any phase's guidelines and shall:
  1. Publish the Sprint version and its link in the Sprint log section of the CNM Cloud Usable wikipage as a part of the next CNM Cyber roundtable in the Retrospective Sprint-version format. If no standup is scheduled or a scheduled standup's time frame doesn't work for the Fellow or doesn't fit the Sprint schedule, contact the Customer and schedule a personal standup.
  2. Participate in a CNM Cyber roundtable as a part of the Sprint retrospective session.
  3. Report the work at CNM Wiki using the format described in the Billable items section above.
  4. Mark the completion rate of the SBI after the Sprint Zero date at the end of the SBI. If the just-finished Sprint made the whole SBI 100% real, enter 100%.
  5. Request the payment from the Customer.

Any time, any phase

At any time, in any phase, the Fellow must:
  1. Ask the Customer as many questions as the Fellow needs.
  2. Conduct the Fellow's work at CNM Wiki unless the work occurred on the shippable deliverables other than CNM Wiki.
  3. Document all the Fellow's work at the discussion page paired to the wikipage that serves as a product epic for the claimed SBI about the topic that shall reflect the Sprint or Sprint Zero version.
  4. State the reason why that SBI is no longer attractive to work on after the Sprint Zero or Sprint version if the Fellow decides to no longer work on the claimed Sprint.
  5. Update the list of SBI stakeholders and reach out to them to collect their requirements. Listing and reaching out may occur many times in any sequence. All updates must be indicated in the reports after the SBI text (or user story in SBI Sprints).

Development cycle

In CNM Agile, any target deliverable, its part, or feature, as well as all the other deliverables that need to be developed for the Project, are going to be developed in a few Sprints, which will continue until the particular target deliverable, its part, or feature is completely developed. These Sprints make up the development cycle as follows:

  1. Product epic Sprints (Sprints A0+) that aim to produce a product epic or a general description of the service or any product such as a software application that supports that service.
  2. User story Sprints (Sprints B0+) that aim to produce a user story or a specific description of the desired function from the end-user point of view. Product epics may serve as a source for user stories.
  3. SBI Sprints (Sprints C0+) that aim to produce a Sprint backlog through including user stories as PBIs into a product backlog and grooming that backlog.
  4. Prototype Sprints (Sprints D0+) that aim to produce a prototype of a future deliverable based on a SBI that is taken out of the Sprint backlog.
  5. MVP Sprints (Sprints E0+) that aim to produce a minimum viable product (MVP) out of the tested prototype.
  6. Marketable product Sprints (Sprints F0+) that aim to produce a marketable product as an improved MVP.

Product epic Sprint

In CNM Agile, product epics are usually wikipages that describe those services and other products that are deliverables of the Project. All the Fellows are encouraged to work as product owners on product epics.
To complete Sprint Zero, the Fellow may:
  1. Pick any unclaimed SBI at the Epics to be available sub-section of the requirements' backlog. Any SBI that doesn't have its Sprint version at the end is unclaimed.
  2. Mark the Sprint Zero version in the Sprint A0.x format at the end of the SBI text.
  3. Guess what this deliverable, its parts, and features should look like.
  4. Search for any relevant information in order to know the current state of the deliverable and its development, as well as to test your vision of the deliverable. You may ask questions, browse available sources, and test existing resources.
  5. List the possible stakeholders and reach out to them to collect their requirements.
  6. Estimate the work on the claimed SBI and, particularly, suggest what the Fellow is going to do and what completeness of the claimed SBI the Fellow expects at the end of the Sprint.
  7. Document the plan on the next CNM Cyber standup's wikipage of CNM Wiki.
  8. Attend a CNM Cyber standup. Contact the Customer and schedule a personal CNM Cyber standup if no standup is scheduled or a scheduled standup is not convenient to attend.
  9. Shape your vision of the deliverable and estimates based on results of your search and update the documents.
To complete Shippable Sprint, the Fellow may:
  1. Mark the Sprint version in the Sprint Ax.y format at the end of the SBI text.
  2. Work on the claimed SBI according to or close to the plan developed in Sprint Zero, if possible. While working, the Fellows cannot bill the Customer for any work outside of CNM Wiki. If one needs to work outside of CNM Wiki, he or she can do so as a volunteer only.
  3. Document the Fellow's work at CNM Wiki.
To complete Billable Sprint, the Fellow may:
  1. After the Sprint version, publish a brief description of the work done and the link to the fuller report.
  2. Review your Sprint as a brief Sprint retrospective in the next CNM Cyber standup.
  3. Report the work at CNM Wiki using the format described in the Billable items section above.
  4. Request the payment from the Customer.
Product epic Sprints can be called Sprints A0+ because they are coded as Sprint A0, A1, A2, A3, etc.

User story Sprint

In CNM Agile and other Agile methodologies, a user story is a brief description of a solution requirement to a desired system that is written from the point of view of a customer or end-user of this system. All the Fellows are encouraged to work as business analysts on user stories.
To complete Sprint Zero, the Fellow may:
  1. Pick any unclaimed SBI at the Stories to be available sub-section of the requirements' backlog. Any SBI that doesn't have its Sprint version at the end is unclaimed.
  2. Mark the Sprint Zero version in the Sprint B0.x format at the end of the SBI text.
  3. Research the existing service, system, or component related to the claimed SBI and its product epic.
  4. Identify the differences between the existing service, system, and/or component as it is (i.e. its as-is status) and its product epic (i.e. its to-be status). These differences are problems to be solved in order to develop the deliverable.
  5. List the possible stakeholders and reach out to them to collect their requirements.
  6. Estimate the work on the claimed SBI and, particularly, suggest what the Fellow is going to do and what completeness of the claimed SBI the Fellow expects at the end of the Sprint.
  7. Document the plan on the next CNM Cyber standup's wikipage of CNM Wiki.
  8. Attend a CNM Cyber standup as a part of the research. Contact the Customer and schedule a personal CNM Cyber standup if no standup is scheduled or a scheduled standup's time frame doesn't work for you or doesn't fit the Sprint schedule.
  9. Shape your plan of the Sprint based on results of your search and update the documents.
To complete Shippable Sprint, the Fellow may:
  1. Mark the Sprint version in the Sprint Bx.y format at the end of the SBI text.
  2. Draft your user story or user stories that would reflect problems to be solved in order to develop the target deliverable, its part, or feature. For example,

    As a candidate to be the CNM project coordinator, I would like to obtain information about that position. This information shall be sufficient to know what I would do when hired.

  3. Publish your user story or user stories on the discussion page linked to the deliverable you picked.
  4. Document the Fellow's work at CNM Wiki.
To complete Billable Sprint, the Fellow may:
  1. After the Sprint version, publish a brief description of the work done and the link to the fuller report.
  2. Review your Sprint as a brief Sprint retrospective in the next CNM Cyber standup.
  3. Report the work at CNM Wiki using the format described in the Billable items section above.
  4. Request the payment from the Customer.
User story Sprints can be called Sprints B0+ because they are coded as Sprint B0, B1, B2, B3, etc.

SBI Sprint

In CNM Agile, a Sprint backlog item (SBI) is the requirement, usually, the user story, that is included in the Sprint backlog. Consequently, a Sprint backlog is a collection of those product backlog items (PBIs) that development is funded.
To complete Sprint Zero, the Fellow may:
  1. Look for user stories published on the discussion pages of CNM Cyber's deliverables.
  2. Pick up any found user story.
  3. Mark the Sprint Zero version in the Sprint C0.x format at the end of the user story text.
  4. Prior to interviews, conduct preliminary research on the claimed SBI.
  5. List possible stakeholders and reach out to them to collect their requirements. Listing and reaching out may occur many times in any sequence. When the list is updated, new reaching outs shall take place. This can happen at any point of the Sprint.
  6. Estimate the work on the claimed SBI and, particularly, suggest what the Fellow is going to do and what completeness of the claimed SBI the Fellow expects at the end of the Sprint.
  7. Document the plan on the next CNM Cyber standup's wikipage of CNM Wiki.
  8. Attend a CNM Cyber standup as a part of the research. Contact the Customer and schedule a personal CNM Cyber standup if no standup is scheduled or a scheduled standup's time frame doesn't work for you or doesn't fit the Sprint schedule.
  9. Shape your vision of the Sprint deliverable and estimates based on results of your search and update the documents.
To complete Shippable Sprint, the Fellow may:
  1. Mark the Sprint version in the Sprint Cx.y format at the end of the SBI text. The uppercase X should coincide with the Sprint Zero letter, the lowercase x should coincide with the Sprint Zero number, and the lowercase y should be substituted with the ordinary number of a new Sprint. If no Sprint has occurred, substitute with 1.The Fellow's mark would indicate that the SBI has been claimed.
  2. Work on the claimed SBI according to or close to the plan developed in Sprint Zero, if possible.
  3. Document the Fellow's work at CNM Wiki unless the work occurred on the shippable deliverables other than CNM Wiki.
To complete Billable Sprint, the Fellow may:
  1. After the Sprint version, publish a brief description of the work done and the link to the fuller report.
  2. Review your Sprint as a brief Sprint retrospective in the next CNM Cyber standup.
  3. Report the work at CNM Wiki using the format described in the Billable items section above.
  4. Request the payment from the Customer.
SBI Sprints can be called Sprints C0+ because they are coded as Sprint C0, C1, C2, C3, etc.

Prototype Sprint

In CNM Agile and other Agile methodologies, a prototype is a partial or preliminary conceptual model of a deliverable developed or to be developed; this model is used as a reference, publicity artifact, or data-gathering tool. The Fellows are invited to execute what they or other product owners defined as to be done. If you choose to do so, you may:

  1. Select one of the first ten user stories in the primary backlog (scroll up or click here).
  2. Create a solution that would solve the problem that the selected user story represents. In order to do so, you are welcome to discover what has already been done and what needs to be done, analyze possible solutions, make decisions what they should do in order to solve it, and plan for their actions. Then, they undertaking whatever legal and ethical activities it takes in order to execute their plans and document their findings.
  3. Deliver the target result, which can be one deliverable of the target deliverables, its feature, or its requirements to the Customer.
  4. If Gary Ihar invites you to do so,
  5. Start your new Sprint while identifying a new problem to be formulated. If you have no problem in mind, you are welcome to pick another target deliverable up.
Prototype Sprints can be called Sprints D0+ because they are coded as Sprint D0, D1, D2, D3, etc.


To complete Sprint Zero, the Fellow may:
  1. Pick up one unclaimed SBI. The SBIs can be found in three Sprint backlogs, which are requirements', DevOps instruments', and shippable deliverables' backlogs.
  2. Mark the Sprint Zero version in the Sprint X0.x format at the end of the SBI text. The uppercase X should be substituted with the Sprint phase letter (the concept of Sprint versions is detailed at the Development cycle section) and the lowercase x should be substituted with the ordinary number of a new Sprint Zero. If no Sprint Zero has occurred, substitute with 1.
  3. Prior to interviews, conduct preliminary research on the claimed SBI.
  4. List possible stakeholders and reach out to them to collect their requirements. Listing and reaching out may occur many times in any sequence. When the list is updated, new reaching outs shall take place. This can happen at any point of the Sprint.
  5. Estimate the work on the claimed SBI and, particularly, suggest what the Fellow is going to do and what completeness of the claimed SBI the Fellow expects at the end of the Sprint.
  6. Document the plan on the next CNM Cyber standup's wikipage of CNM Wiki.
  7. Attend a CNM Cyber standup as a part of the research. Contact the Customer and schedule a personal CNM Cyber standup if no standup is scheduled or a scheduled standup's time frame doesn't work for you or doesn't fit the Sprint schedule.
  8. Shape your vision of the Sprint deliverable and estimates based on results of your search and update the documents.
To complete Shippable Sprint, the Fellow may:
  1. Mark the Sprint version in the Sprint Xx.y format at the end of the SBI text. The uppercase X should coincide with the Sprint Zero letter, the lowercase x should coincide with the Sprint Zero number, and the lowercase y should be substituted with the ordinary number of a new Sprint. If no Sprint has occurred, substitute with 1.The Fellow's mark would indicate that the SBI has been claimed.
  2. Work on the claimed SBI according to or close to the plan developed in Sprint Zero, if possible.
  3. Document the Fellow's work at CNM Wiki unless the work occurred on the shippable deliverables other than CNM Wiki.
To complete Billable Sprint, the Fellow may:
  1. After the Sprint version, publish a brief description of the work done and the link to the fuller report.
  2. Review your Sprint as a brief Sprint retrospective in the next CNM Cyber standup.
  3. Report the work at CNM Wiki using the format described in the Billable items section above.
  4. Request the payment from the Customer.

MVP Sprint

In CNM Agile and other Agile methodologies, a minimum viable product (MVP) is a version of a new marketable that includes sufficient features to satisfy early adopters and allows a team to collect the maximum amount of validated learning about customers with the least effort.
MVP Sprints can be called Sprints E0+ because they are coded as Sprint E0, E1, E2, E3, etc.
To complete Sprint Zero, the Fellow may:
  1. Pick up one unclaimed SBI. The SBIs can be found in three Sprint backlogs, which are requirements', DevOps instruments', and shippable deliverables' backlogs.
  2. Mark the Sprint Zero version in the Sprint X0.x format at the end of the SBI text. The uppercase X should be substituted with the Sprint phase letter (the concept of Sprint versions is detailed at the Development cycle section) and the lowercase x should be substituted with the ordinary number of a new Sprint Zero. If no Sprint Zero has occurred, substitute with 1.
  3. Prior to interviews, conduct preliminary research on the claimed SBI.
  4. List possible stakeholders and reach out to them to collect their requirements. Listing and reaching out may occur many times in any sequence. When the list is updated, new reaching outs shall take place. This can happen at any point of the Sprint.
  5. Estimate the work on the claimed SBI and, particularly, suggest what the Fellow is going to do and what completeness of the claimed SBI the Fellow expects at the end of the Sprint.
  6. Document the plan on the next CNM Cyber standup's wikipage of CNM Wiki.
  7. Attend a CNM Cyber standup as a part of the research. Contact the Customer and schedule a personal CNM Cyber standup if no standup is scheduled or a scheduled standup's time frame doesn't work for you or doesn't fit the Sprint schedule.
  8. Shape your vision of the Sprint deliverable and estimates based on results of your search and update the documents.
To complete Shippable Sprint, the Fellow may:
  1. Mark the Sprint version in the Sprint Xx.y format at the end of the SBI text. The uppercase X should coincide with the Sprint Zero letter, the lowercase x should coincide with the Sprint Zero number, and the lowercase y should be substituted with the ordinary number of a new Sprint. If no Sprint has occurred, substitute with 1.The Fellow's mark would indicate that the SBI has been claimed.
  2. Work on the claimed SBI according to or close to the plan developed in Sprint Zero, if possible.
  3. Document the Fellow's work at CNM Wiki unless the work occurred on the shippable deliverables other than CNM Wiki.
To complete Billable Sprint, the Fellow may:
  1. After the Sprint version, publish a brief description of the work done and the link to the fuller report.
  2. Review your Sprint as a brief Sprint retrospective in the next CNM Cyber standup.
  3. Report the work at CNM Wiki using the format described in the Billable items section above.
  4. Request the payment from the Customer.

Marketable product Sprint

In CNM Agile, a marketable product is any marketable that can be sold on the market.
Marketable product Sprints can be called Sprints F0+ because they are coded as Sprint F0, F1, F2, F3, etc.


To complete Sprint Zero, the Fellow may:
  1. Pick up one unclaimed SBI. The SBIs can be found in three Sprint backlogs, which are requirements', DevOps instruments', and shippable deliverables' backlogs.
  2. Mark the Sprint Zero version in the Sprint X0.x format at the end of the SBI text. The uppercase X should be substituted with the Sprint phase letter (the concept of Sprint versions is detailed at the Development cycle section) and the lowercase x should be substituted with the ordinary number of a new Sprint Zero. If no Sprint Zero has occurred, substitute with 1.
  3. Prior to interviews, conduct preliminary research on the claimed SBI.
  4. List possible stakeholders and reach out to them to collect their requirements. Listing and reaching out may occur many times in any sequence. When the list is updated, new reaching outs shall take place. This can happen at any point of the Sprint.
  5. Estimate the work on the claimed SBI and, particularly, suggest what the Fellow is going to do and what completeness of the claimed SBI the Fellow expects at the end of the Sprint.
  6. Document the plan on the next CNM Cyber standup's wikipage of CNM Wiki.
  7. Attend a CNM Cyber standup as a part of the research. Contact the Customer and schedule a personal CNM Cyber standup if no standup is scheduled or a scheduled standup's time frame doesn't work for you or doesn't fit the Sprint schedule.
  8. Shape your vision of the Sprint deliverable and estimates based on results of your search and update the documents.
To complete Shippable Sprint, the Fellow may:
  1. Mark the Sprint version in the Sprint Xx.y format at the end of the SBI text. The uppercase X should coincide with the Sprint Zero letter, the lowercase x should coincide with the Sprint Zero number, and the lowercase y should be substituted with the ordinary number of a new Sprint. If no Sprint has occurred, substitute with 1.The Fellow's mark would indicate that the SBI has been claimed.
  2. Work on the claimed SBI according to or close to the plan developed in Sprint Zero, if possible.
  3. Document the Fellow's work at CNM Wiki unless the work occurred on the shippable deliverables other than CNM Wiki.
To complete Billable Sprint, the Fellow may:
  1. After the Sprint version, publish a brief description of the work done and the link to the fuller report.
  2. Review your Sprint as a brief Sprint retrospective in the next CNM Cyber standup.
  3. Report the work at CNM Wiki using the format described in the Billable items section above.
  4. Request the payment from the Customer.

Product backlogs

The Team divided product backlogs into Sprint backlogs and prospective backlogs.

Sprint backlogs

In CNM Agile, Sprint backlogs represent those PBIs that development is funded. The PBIs that are included into one of Sprint backlogs become SBIs. If you are the Fellow, you can claim any unclaimed SBI to work on. Three primary backlogs reflect three types of the target deliverables:
  1. DevOps instruments' backlog clarifies development of DevOps instruments.
  2. Requirements' backlog clarifies development of requirements.
  3. Shippable deliverables' backlog clarifies development of shippable deliverables.

Prospective backlogs

In the nutshell, Friends Of CNM is willing to pay for everything that will better any process for new apprentices to get enrolled in our Welcome Session, get graduated, and start working.
The Team members may use discussion pages of CNM Wiki to draft prospective backlogs, which can be also used for the research and situational awareness purposes. Every wikipage at CNM Wiki has its corresponding discussion page, which access button is located in the left upper area of any page. For instance, the https://wiki.friendsofcnm.org/en/Talk:CNM_Cloud_Project_Coordinator discussion page should be used for the Fellow's role development.

DevOps instruments' backlog

The Team needs help with envisioning of its support including its organizational culture including instructions, policies, recommendations, and/or job descriptions such as this one. While being documented, those visions shall become requirements and be included in Sprint backlogs.

Events

  1. As the Fellow, I would like to participate in a CNM Cyber standup, so I can report my performance, express my intentions, and request any help.
  2. As someone who may be interested in becoming the Fellow, I would like to join an CNM Cyber event, so I can comment on the content, suggest improvements, share challenges, brainstorm on new ideas, ask any questions directly and get the answers.

Job descriptions

  1. As the Fellow, I would like to see this very job description on this very wikipage improved, so I can be more productive.

Requirements' backlog

Epics to be available

For the product epic Sprints (Sprints A0+),
  1. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Cabin wikipage developed, so I can research the existing service, identify the gaps, and create user stories.
  2. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Cert wikipage developed, so I can research the existing service, identify the gaps, and create user stories.
  3. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Certware wikipage developed, so I can research the existing system, identify the gaps, and create user stories.
  4. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Cyber Orientation wikipage developed, so I can create user stories.
  5. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Cyber Placement wikipage developed, so I can create user stories.
  6. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Cyber Welcome Session wikipage developed, so I can research the existing course, identify the gaps, and create user stories.
  7. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Lab wikipage developed, so I can research the existing service, identify the gaps, and create user stories.
  8. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Labware wikipage developed, so I can research the existing systems, identify the gaps, and create user stories.
  9. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Linkup wikipage developed, so I can research the existing service, identify the gaps, and create user stories.
  10. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Linkupware wikipage developed, so I can research the existing system, identify the gaps, and create user stories.
  11. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Mail wikipage developed, so I can research the existing service, identify the gaps, and create user stories.
  12. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Middleware wikipage developed, so I can research the existing system, identify the gaps, and create user stories.
  13. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Page wikipage developed, so I can research the existing service, identify the gaps, and create user stories.
  14. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Pageware wikipage developed, so I can research the existing system, identify the gaps, and create user stories.
  15. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Servers wikipage developed, so I can research the existing systems, identify the gaps, and create user stories.
  16. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Social wikipage developed, so I can research the existing service, identify the gaps, and create user stories.
  17. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Socialware wikipage developed, so I can research the existing system, identify the gaps, and create user stories.
  18. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Talk wikipage developed, so I can research the existing service, identify the gaps, and create user stories.
  19. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Talkware wikipage developed, so I can create user stories.
  20. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Tube wikipage developed, so I can research the existing service, identify the gaps, and create user stories.
  21. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Tubeware wikipage developed, so I can research the existing system, identify the gaps, and create user stories.
  22. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Venture wikipage developed, so I can research the existing service, identify the gaps, and create user stories.
  23. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Ventureware wikipage developed, so I can research the existing system, identify the gaps, and create user stories.
  24. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Wiki wikipage developed, so I can research the existing service, identify the gaps, and create user stories.
  25. As the Fellow, I would like to see the CNM Wikiware wikipage developed, so I can research the existing system, identify the gaps, and create user stories.
If the Fellow looks for more SBIs, he or she may check the high-level deliverables that are listed in the Deliverables of the Phase section of the CNM Cloud Usable wikipage.

Stories to be available

  1. As the Fellow, who cannot find any SBI attractive enough to work on, I would like to see product epics, so I can compare them with actual services and other products, develop new PBIs based on the discovered divergences, and propose their inclusion into a Sprint backlog.

SBIs to be available

  1. As the Fellow, I would like to have SBIs available in the Sprint backlogs, so I can work on those SBIs.

Webinar Epic

  • As the project owner and customer, I would like to conduct webinars to invite people for an opportunity of collaboration in the development of my project and operations, as volunteers. Webinar would primarily deliver content of the on-boarding courses, CNM Cyber Welcome Session and Orientation . The agenda of webinars will be adjusted with time and in accordance with project needs.

Shippable deliverables' backlog

Cabin deliverables

Cert deliverables

  1. As a candidate enrolled into the CNM Cyber Orientation, I need to get all the learning contents such as texts, graphics, and videos, as well as learning resources such as printable handouts in order to study and pass its final exam, so I can continue with the CNM Cyber Placement.
  2. As a candidate enrolled into the CNM Cyber Placement, I need to get all the learning contents such as texts, graphics, and videos, as well as learning resources such as printable handouts in order to study, so I can start acting as the Fellow.
  3. As a learner enrolled into the CNM Cyber Welcome Session and, later, CNM Cyber Orientation, I need to receive a notification and further instructions when I complete the course, so I would be oriented what I should do next.
  4. As a graduate from the CNM Cyber Welcome Session, I need to get a printable certificate that I have obtained a Certified CNM Cyber User certification.
  5. As a graduate from the CNM Cyber Welcome Session, who is interested in employment credentials, I need my name and other details to be searchable in the database of Certified CNM Cyber Users.

Lab deliverables

  1. As a user of CNM Lab, I would like to see rules for organization of data, including publicly-available data at CNM Wiki and confidential, as well as source codes and other resources, so I can work on my SBIs more efficiently.
  2. As a Careerprise contractor, I would like to be able to access all the source codes and confidential data such as cybersecurity details related to the sub-project I am hired for, so I can work on that sub-project.

Linkup deliverables

Mail deliverables

  1. As a graduate from the CNM Cyber Welcome Session, I would like to be able to manage my emails, including their receipt, reading, organizing, deleting, composing, and sending.

Page deliverables

The website term can refer to CNMCyber.com, FriendsOfCNM.org, and/or WorldOpp.org.
  1. As someone who would like both (a) to get enrolled into a 4-year-long university college program and (b) to work for at least 3 of 4 study years in order to earn money, while earning the college degree, I need to get to the website landing page, find all the relevant information about WorldOpp that will allow me to:
    1. Understand what the WorldOpp programme is,
    2. Decide whether this programme fits my needs, and
    3. If so, proceed to some registration page,
    so I can start onboarding as the Fellow in order to solve both challenges with the Friends Of CNM.
  2. As someone who would like to learn new skills and/or build my new career network on my limited budget, I need to get to the website landing page, find all the relevant information about learning on the job and building networks through volunteering for CNM Cyber Team and proceed to some registration page, so I can start onboarding as a CNM Cyber Project Coordinator.
  3. As someone who has decided to become the Fellow, I need to register with the CNM Cyber platform and get (preferably, automatically) enrolled into the CNM Cyber Welcome Session, so I can continue with the CNM Cyber Orientation.
  4. As someone who has decided to become a CNM Cyber Project Coordinator, I need to register with the CNM Cyber platform and get (preferably, automatically) enrolled into the CNM Cyber Welcome Session, so I can continue with the CNM Cyber Orientation.

Server deliverables

  1. As a future Fellow, I would like to learn about CNM Servers in order to be able to coordinate their development.

Social deliverables

  1. As someone who is qualified to take the CNM Cyber Welcome Session, I would like to consider joining those communities of my choice that welcome new members, so I can network and stay in touch.
  2. As someone who has joined one or more communities at CNM Lab, I would like to be able to quit when I choose so.

Venture deliverables

  1. As a graduate from the CNM Cyber Welcome Session, I would like to track my job search, including leads, emails, and contacts.

Tube deliverables

  1. As a visitor of CNM Tube, I would like to see a list of tags, so I can navigate through its videos.
  2. As a graduate from the CNM Cyber Welcome Session, I would like to comment on the videos that are published at CNM Tube.

Wiki deliverables

  1. As a visitor of CNM Wiki, I would like to see a list of categories, so I can navigate through its wikipages.
  2. As a graduate from the CNM Cyber Welcome Session, I would like to edit its wikipages.

Claimed SBIs

Gary

  1. As the only Fellow and, at the same time, the primary financing customer of this Project, I, Gary Ihar, need to recruit one or more Fellows who should be able to take over any part of my Fellow's role, so I would be able to concentrate on financing of this Project. This recruitment consists of (1) sourcing or finding the candidates and (2) onboarding or enabling the candidates to work. Onboarding consists of three phases:
    1. CNM Cyber Welcome Session, which shall introduce the candidates to CNM Cyber,
    2. CNM Cyber Orientation, which shall overview career administration, as well as to introduce the candidates to Friends Of CNM and WorldOpp Fellow Staff, and
    3. CNM Cyber Placement, which shall help the candidates acquire those KSAs that the candidates need in order to start actually working. This very wikipage reflects those KSAs.
    The curricula of CNM Cyber Welcome Session and CNM Cyber Orientation are mostly defined. The curriculum for CNM Cyber Placement is roughly drafted and now is at about 20% completion rate.

Mariam

  1. As a candidate enrolled into the CNM Cyber Welcome Session, I need to get all the learning contents such as texts, graphics, and videos, as well as learning resources such as printable handouts in order to study and pass its final exam, so I can continue with the CNM Cyber Orientation if I choose to become the Fellow or CNM Cyber Project Coordinator.
  2. As the Customer, I need the complete requirements for a series of CNM Cyber events, including a necessary contract form, so I can award the contract to some contractor and be sure that this contractor knows what I pay for.
  3. As a CertStudent, I need to have detailed information about Forum feature of CNM Cert so I can have a full knowledge to use it for concerned activities at the platform.

Kevin

  1. As a CertStudent I would like to be able to enroll into the CNM Cyber Orientation, get all the learning contents such as texts, graphics, and videos, as well as learning resources such as printable handouts in order to study and fill survey questions so I can continue with the CNM Cyber Placement.

Recruitment process

Sourcing of potential candidates is an ongoing endeavor, which cannot be limited to the following channels and tools.

Channels

Freelance marketplaces are the only channel for now; the other channels are yet to be developed. The CNM Cyber Project Coordinator wikipage may or may not be taken as a starting point.

Legacy announcement

The following announcement was developed to source the Fellow candidates at freelance marketplaces, but wasn't successful:

IT Project Coordinator (Agile) is needed -- no tech skills are required to start

Do you want to know what exactly you need to do? Do you want to know your tasks? Are you a detail-oriented freelancer willing to do everything accurately, patiently, and on time? Please stop this reading here and do something else. The incumbent of this position will work on various deliverables and perform those tasks that are required in order to deliver those deliverables. And, because no one has done those tasks before, there is no chance to accomplish those unknown yet tasks accurately or on time.

Hey, guys, we need an IT Project Coordinator (Agile) -- no education, no experience is fine, but curiosity, willingness to take risks and make errors, as well as love to document are the musts. Although this role is not just about writing, yes, the incumbent of this role may do some technical writing for the project -- this is an opportunity to learn information technology if one needs to. That also means that no IT skills are required in order to start, but you should be willing to learn on your job.

On-the-job training will be provided through our mentor-to-protege program if you are hired. You will not be hired unless you start asking meaningful questions and, factually, perform as a tester.

The most detailed and up-to-date job description is published at https://wiki.friendsofcnm.org/en/CNM_Cloud_Project_Coordinator (please visit that page).

We have no preference with regard to your schedule of work; at the end of the day, all we need is the developed technology. Technology development is not your task; documenting the technology, organizing team's meetings, as well as hiring and/or managing other developers might be yours. Your upwork contract is a-la-carte -- you should choose what part you would like to work on and establish your tasks. No priorities are established. This project is agile -- when you accomplish one tasks, you should move to some others; correct -- the work you should do most of time may not possibly exist.

No further instructions, particular tasks, nor details would be available unless you or another candidate ask specific questions about what needs to be done and what is available. No one can tell you what your next step should be; vice versa, you can always expect my response whether your proposed actions would be funded. And, of course, you are welcome to ask any number of questions about your job description or expected deliverables.

You are welcome to create your own schedule if you decide that you need one.

Current announcement

Launch or enhance your IT career today! Apprentices are urgently needed! Neither education nor experience is required to start! Create an account (a.k.a. "register") at opplet.net, click on CNM Cert, enter your login and password, and enroll yourself (a.k.a. "Self-enrollment") into the "Welcome Course." Your login name is not significant; the system will assign you a student alias. Your email is not necessary -- you can leave it blank. Alternatively, you can access this course at cert.cnmcyber.com -- log in and click Site home. Training and other promising employer's services are free of charge.

Onboarding process

Any training path concentrates on general methodologies in product ownership and project management such as CNM Agile rather than specific instructions. If a candidate is able to use CNM Agile, or any other topic, he or she can skip that part.
The promising Fellows shall reach three milestones in order to get onboarded:
  1. Pass the Welcome Session, which is designed to introduce promising Fellows to CNM Cyber and CNM Cloud.
  2. Get graduated from the CNM Cyber Orientation, which is designed to introduce promising Fellows to career administration, the Career Network Ministry and the Team.
  3. Start producing deliverables listed in the target deliverables while being enrolled into the CNM Cyber Placement. This training literally places a Fellow candidate in the job. Because of variety of the Fellow's activities, no unified placement training exists. This seminar can be described as an individualized combination of learning and hands-on training, which shall include a deal of guided self-study and experiments.
When an aspiring candidate is prepared theoretically, he or she is placed on the job as an apprentice first. He or she becomes a protégé and shall be assigned one or more mentors through the mentor-to-protege program. The Fellow is welcome to attend weekly meetings with his or her mentor, which can last up to one hour, and request more time and/or mentors when they are needed.

Challenges while on the job

Being lost

The Friends Of CNM started developing documents as early as in 2012. Hundreds of developers contributed to its current resources, and every of those developers has had his or her own style, solutions, descriptions, or lack of those. Even the same developer has most likely had various thoughts and considerations at various times. There is no way to avoid confusion.
Trust yourself in your belief that you are not stupid. Clearing the confusion is an essential part of your job. If the confusion refers to internal documents, spend some time to write your questions down and ask them. If the confusion refers to external documents, research available documents, forums, frequently-asked questions, chats, and everything else that your search engine might suggest. If that approach doesn't help, ask your Customer and/or other stakeholders. And, whatever you found, update the contents of CNM Wiki. All in all, you are paid to clear any confusions and contribute to the organizational knowledge base.

Engaging with the community

The Impostor syndrome is common in the information technology industry; some suggest that more than a half of the developers, especially minorities, feel like they don't belong. That's okay not to know what others know, not to be skilled in what others are, and not to be able to accomplish what others can. Others may not know what you know, be skilled in what you skilled, and can do what you can.
Don't hesitate to connect with the others in your community or communities. Follow the trends, learn from the others, attend meetups, and communicate your own uniqueness.

Lacking full requirements

For everyone who has ever performed as the Fellow, obtaining the right requirements is the hardest skills to learn. Working without requirements and specifications can be compared with building without understanding of what needs to be build. Holes in requirements tend to result in wasted enterprise effort and effort debt.
Collecting complete requirements is the vital part of your job. Research for the documented requirements, make sense of them or ask questions. Interview the Customer, another project owner when he or she is hired, and other key stakeholders to learn what they believe the scopes of both your deliverable and its development should be. And, what is highly important, don't commit to any work unless you have a complete understanding of purpose of your future deliverable.

Managing expectations

One of the hardest skills that the Fellow needs to learn would be estimation of the enterprise effort. SPIs may look easy on the Sprint backlog, but can turn out hard during their development. Quick fixes can turn out time-consuming struggles.
At the same token, stakeholders always push for faster results. If you move too slow, you will be criticized. If you move too fast, you can burn out fast and/or compromise the quality.
So, your new skills may include finding the right balance and communication of your findings as early as possible. Finding the right balance often includes being honest with yourself and aware of your capacities.
Your findings should not necessarily be unpleasant to the stakeholders. You may find some parts of SBIs that are not vital and, for instance, your minimum viable product (MVP) can be developed without them. Thus, you can request their movement to a new Sprint.

Missing the right resources

There will be time when your computer resources, wifi bandwidth, access to servers, specification documents, etc. slow down your work. When so, send a written request to the Customer and schedule reminders to follow up for a case if the Customer didn't get back soon. You may also request to eliminate a function that require the most resources or move it to the next Sprint. And communicate your needs during CNM Cyber standups and other contacts with the CNM Cyber Team.

Keeping up with tasks

The Fellows may juggle multiple tasks simultaneously. Everyone, even other Fellows, may need your time. That is why time tracking and prioritizing is important.
A few instruments such as Kimai and CNM Lab can be used to track your time. Having data, you can divide your tasks in essential and non-essential in order to prioritize the essential ones and outsource/modify/delegate non-essential ones.

Updating your skills

Change is the only constant of the Fellow's work. Whatever you know today may or may not be relevant tomorrow. Even if you are a genius when it comes to learning "on the fly," you still need time to find the learning content and/or reflect on it.
Updating your skills often starts with dedicating some time for it. Your research may include reading, testing, participating in projects. If you decide to bill your Customer for that time, draft your user story, get it approved, and don't forget to reflect on your new skills on CNM Wiki.

See also

Frequently asked questions

The discussion page publishes both frequently asked questions and the answers.

Related lectures